Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality, made history again on Friday as the first woman and the first Jewish person to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol, encircled by images of prominent Americans.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Ginsburg, a stalwart liberal on the high court since 1993, died last Friday at age 87. Known simply as RBG, she was an icon to millions of Americans – especially young girls – after a long legal career built on fighting for gender equality.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Many female lawmakers were in attendance, including vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris. The masked group honoring Ginsburg’s legacy and 27 years on the high court remained safely distanced in the approximately 100 seats.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
“We have a lot of cause for … observance of a historic time, for a historic woman who did more for the equality of women than anybody in our history,” House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters on Thursday. Lawmakers and guests, including Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden, held their hand over their hearts as Ginsburg’s casket was placed on the Lincoln Catafalque, which first supported President Abraham Lincoln’s casket in the U.S. Capitol after his assassination in 1865.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer stood at the entrance to the Capitol as Ginsburg’s coffin was brought to the Capitol after a public visitation across the street at the Supreme Court, the hearse flanked by four police motorcycles.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
“Her passing is like a death in so many families in our country because so many people pinned their hopes, heeded her guidance, admired her stamina, her love of the arts, bringing civility to her relationships in the court and in the country,” Pelosi said.