Trump 'I’m not starting a new party' in first speech following presidency
Donald Trump made his first post-presidential speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) on Sunday, insisting that he will not split from the Republicans and start a new party and hinting that he might try to take back the White House in 2024.
“Who knows, I may decide to beat them for a third time,” the former president said, again making the false assertion that he had defeated Biden last November.
Delivering his first in-person speech since his presidency to the Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando on Sunday, Trump drew a line in the sand between his supporters and the remaining faction of the party that supported his impeachment.
Trump 'I’m not starting a new party' in first speech following presidency
“I am not starting a new party. They kept saying he was going to ‘start a brand new party.’ We have the Republican Party. It is going to unite and be stronger than before. I am not starting a new party. That was fake news,” Trump said. “Wouldn’t that be brilliant? Let’s start a new party and let’s divide our vote so that you can never win. No, we’re not interested in that.”
While Trump vows a united Republican Party, he has dispensed abhorrence toward members of the party who voted to impeach him, endorsing opposition campaigns in attempts to unseat some of the 10 House members who voted for impeachment.
He also released a scathing statement about Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell earlier this month. While McConnell did not vote to convict Trump during the impeachment trial, McConnell suggested that the former president can be held liable for the insurrection at the US Capitol on Jan. 6 that resulted in the deaths of five people, including a Capitol Police officer.
Those in attendance at CPAC responded by making Trump their overwhelming favorite to win the Republican nomination in 2024. In a straw poll of participants, 55% said they would support Trump, while 21% said they would support Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. The rest all polled at or below 4%.
Trump 'I’m not starting a new party' in first speech following presidency
Without Trump on the ballot, DeSantis was the leading candidate among those polled at 43%, followed by South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, who polled at 11%. Donald Trump Jr. came in third at 8%.
While Trump rallied the base that could push him toward another party nomination in 2024, some Republicans aren’t ready to accept the GOP as the party of Trump.